INSTALLATION ARTIST BAISIL KINCAID’S QUEST IN EXPLORING GHANA’S ENVIRONMENTALISM CULTURE

Baisil Kincaid is an artist in residence at Art Connect International and a member of the St. Louis Reclamation Arts Team. Having lived and worked in Ghana for almost a year, he indulges in creative ventures that go to quench his thirst for life, as he puts it; “I make art for fun, for intellectual & spiritual exploration, for discipline and emotional expression.”

He displayed a large scale public installation just last month consisting of works made from discarded scratch cards found in the Accra La vicinity formally used to purchase cell phone call credits or Wi-Fi data bundles.

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(photo credit: artist)
(photo credit: artist)

(photo credit: artist)

“My team and I have been making modular two dimensional works that stand alone as individual works of art, as well as working together seamlessly for when we stage public installation work.”
He goes on to explain that he was drawn to the scratch cards by their radiant and attractive colouration, and their everyday use as obviously identified on the Ghanaian society’s consumer’s list. He shares his journey, being concerned about the important role the internet plays in our contemporary daily lives. “The material itself raises a lot of questions and the more I looked at them and interacted with the materials the more questions came up in my mind.”
The effects of internet in connection with every day’s individualistic or societal entanglement of identities and the stint of social media tools influencing interpersonal interactions inform his work. He asks; “How is technological “advancement” affecting the environment? And how is the internet and social media connecting and disconnecting us from one another.”
This portion of his work is a figment of a bigger dream to address the dependence on electronics, climate change and the global push for greater technology leaving magnanimous remains of electronic waste impacting the environment in negative ways as seen at the about 4 acre suburb of Accra, Agbogbloshie where nearly a million tons of imported electronic waste are discarded. It is thought-provoking to note that Accra [dot] alt’s Chale Wote Festival 2015 to be held at Jamestown, Accra in August bears this essential message; “African Electronics.”
Baisil Kincaid has also put out works that address the ill-effects of plastic waste in the environment and why it is a threat to the environment at a faster rate. Recently, there was a flood that took lives in Accra and the serious sanitation problem is a main factor as majority of the population is conglomerating along the coasts, standing on the front row of the large plastic waste accumulation in the form of an ugly nebulous tide.
(photo credit: artist)
(photo credit: artist)

(photo credit: artist)

“I am designed for one purpose: to use art as a tool to heighten consciousness, proliferating a critical pursuit of freedom, in the spirit of love.” – Baisil Kincaid
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Author: Kwame 'Write' Aidoo

Kwame Aidoo, also known as Write is a fond reader, writer and lover of music and the arts, with a degree in Biochemistry from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Tech., Kumasi and a certificate in Cultural Organizations in Transition from University of Lüneburg. He founded the creative activism movement: Inkfluent which curates Slam Ghana, The Write Experience, Vocal Portraits poetry albums, Slam Lab and the biggest literary festival in Ghana; Nkabom Literary Festival. Aside Ghana, where he is based, he has shown work in Brazil, Togo, Austria, France, Benin, Germany and Burkina Faso and most recently Norway with Aurora Ekvatorialis; a light sculpture and texts collaboration with Norwegian artist Toril Johannessen, exhibiting at the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo, 16.9.2016 – 15.1.2017.

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